Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Some Mongolian pop and contemporary art

Solongo Mellecker, Mongolian pop artist. One can buy prints here.
"I was born and grew up in Mongolia. After receiving my BFA in Mongolian Traditional Painting, I moved to Atlanta to pursue illustration and received my MFA in Illustration from SCAD Atlanta. My illustrations are unique and whimsical, inspired by folk tales, myths and imaginations with my style that is influenced by both Mongolian and Western culture. I have been working as a freelance illustrator over 10 years illustrating for editorials, advertising, children’s books, postcards and textile designs.








I am comfortable working with variety of mediums such as acrylics, color pencils, watercolors, ink and gouache and digital media. My illustrations have been featured in professional shows for both Society of Illustrators Los Angeles and New York, Illustration annuals from 3 x 3 Magazine, Society of Illustrators NY, Spectrum 18. I also enjoy showcasing my illustrations and painting in various galleries throughout the US. I live and freelance from my little home studio in Atlanta, Georgia."
The Goddess of Death





Werewolf
Nammy
White Night
No Pets Allowed
Hidden Treasure
Siberian Beauty
Alice in Wonderland 1
Mongolian Death Worm
Banshee
The Crocodile Goddess
Mongol Empire Map
The Fishing Hole
Collective Unconscious
Old Man Dalantai
Scarlett
Yama
Surprise Guest
Birth
Jorogumo
Baba Yaga the Goddess of Death
Shadow of the Colossus

Another contemporary Mongolian artist, Zayasaikhan Sambuu
Zayasaikhan Sambuu, Zaya, was born in a small town Baatsagaan Bayankhongor in Mongolian 1975 , During his teenage years the oppression and censorship of communism began to fade away; which enabled the re emergence of forgotten Mongolian culture and heritage as well as the freedom of religion. Growing nationalism and religious freedom allowed many people to practice Buddhism and as a skilled teenager Zaya was greatly encouraged by the elders to depict portraits of Buddhist Gods in order to recover their religious customs and values. That had been forbidden by the communist regime for more than a decade. For this reason, Zaya was first introduced to art through Buddhism. Indeed, Buddhism had especially influenced him and at the age of 15 he decided to become a monk.

However, after studying Tibetan religious texts for two years, he realized that he had a greater interest in art itself rather than religion. In addition, the lifestyle of the monks and the strict rules of religion clashed with his artistic personality and creative mentality. At the age of 17, Zaya enrolled at the Soyol Fine Art College in Ulaanbaatar to study traditional Mongolian fine arts. After finishing college, he continued to study at the Institute of Fine Art at the Mongolian University of Culture and Art, graduating in 2002.



Another Mongolian artist, Xue Mo.
Xue Mo's premise is that the composition of these paintings act as a focal point for meditation on such concepts as virtue, beauty, serenity, benevolence, and tranquility.

Variously described as "Renaissance", "Chinese Vermeer" or "Medici- like portraiture", Xue Mo's paintings evoke a timeless elegance and a return to pure painting. Critic Katherine Wilkinson has written, "In the 20th Century, many Asian artists have sited, in the human figure, the portrayal and exploration of their own and their society’s identity and history and its changing relationship with other nations and a global culture...Xue considers her work deeply affected by old Chinese culture, its traditional music, calligraphy and early portraiture."

After graduating in 1991 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting, Xue Mo lectured in Fine Art in Beijing for many years before beginning her career as a full-time professional artist.

She has exhibited in Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong, the US and Australia. The Diane Farris Gallery provides her first exposure in Canada.

1966 Born in Inner Mongolia, China
1982 Graduated from Fine Art Department, Ximon Normal School
1982 - 1986 Art teacher, elementary and middle schools
1991 BA, Fine Art Department, Meitan Normal College
1991- 1996 Lecturer of Fine Art, Meitan Normal College

Miss Gao Wa
Portrait of Miss Tong Tong (2009)

Qimuge
Arsgen
Qimuge
Naren Gaowa
"Mongolian Series #2", 2003
Naren Tuya", 2010
Portrait of Miss Tuya, 2006
Mongolian Girl in National Dress 2
Mongolian Girl in National Dress 2009
Portrait of Miss Gaowa. 2009
Resting
 The art of eagle hunting in Mongolia, photographed by Asher Svidensky

"I found her in the form of Ashol Pan, the daughter of an experienced eagle hunter around Han Gohadok, which is south of Ulgii. She was perfect. I was amazed by her comfort and ease as she began handling the grand eagle for the first time in her life. She was fearlessly carrying it on her hand and caressing it somewhat joyfully."

Photo credit: Asher Svidensky
The Ordos Museum in Inner Mongolia
Ordos Museum by MAD from Dezeen on Vimeo.
Coral Mask of  Begtse early 20th century . "In spite of the use of unusual materials, this extraordinary dance mask of the worldly protector Begtse (Mongolian: Jamsaran) follows typical proportions and conventions. Coral masks of Begtse are unique to Mongolia, though less than ten of them are known to exist. Begtse gained importance in that region as protector of the Bogda Gegeens, the leaders of Mongolian Buddhism."


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